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MILITARY ENTRANCE
PROCESSING STATIONS
EASTERN
SECTOR
WESTERN
SECTOR

"A Day at the Meps"

So, you have decided to join the United States armed forces, part of a long honored tradition. In this video we're going to show you just what you will do during enlistment processing at your local Military Entrance Processing Station, or MEPS.

The purpose of the MEPS is to determine if you are qualified and ready for military service.

On the night before your processing, many of you will stay with other recruits in a motel close to your MEPS. The cost of your room will be covered by the government. It's important that you follow the house rules while staying in the motel. Any misconduct will be treated accordingly.

You are going to get up early so make sure you eat a good breakfast because it will be a long day. The MEPS will provide you Lunch at no cost, and Dinner for those of you who will stay over night in the motel.

When you arrive at the MEPS, you will go through a metal detector and your bags will be checked for contraband such as weapons and illegal items. If found, your entrance into MEPS may be denied.

You should wear comfortable clothing of suitable appearance. Hats, headbands, sleeveless shirts, open-toed shoes, tank tops, midriffs or halter-tops, and clothing with objectionable or obscene words are not allowed. Underwear is mandatory.

MEPS personnel will help you go through five basic steps in the enlistment processing at your MEPS center.

The five steps are…

…aptitude testing…
…medical examination…
…job search…
…background screening…
…and the oath of enlistment.

When you come to MEPS, the first step in the enlistment process will be aptitude testing. However, if you already have been tested, you may not need to retake the test.

The test you will take is called the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB.

All branches of the armed forces use the ASVAB to find out what your abilities are. The results of your ASVAB will help you and your service decide what your career opportunity should be. You will receive your ASVAB test results during your medical exam. If you don't get a qualifying score, your processing stops. You can retake the ASVAB another day.

Your next stop will be your physical examination. This exam determines your physical aptitude for career options in the armed forces.

It also tells you which career opportunities you may be qualified for.

Accuracy and truthfulness are essential in completing your medical history for determining what job you will get and not risk your personal health and safety.

They will test your vision…

…and hearing…

…and blood pressure.

You will undergo a series of maneuvers to determine your physical capabilities. You will have blood drawn to test for the HIV virus. You will have a drug and alcohol test. All female applicants are tested for pregnancy. An authorized Medical Practitioner will give you a private exam.

You will be asked to provide the name and phone number of your family physician. Also, if you wear glasses or contact lenses, bring them with you.

After you have your ASVAB and medical test results, you will talk to a service liaison or counselor. Your aptitude tests, medical results and job availability at the time of your enlistment all will be considered in your job selection.

During your background screening, MEPS personnel make sure you understand the conditions of your enlistment; this step also ensures you understand what you're signed up to do!

You will be asked some questions about your marital status, drug or alcohol abuse, law violations and concealment of physical problems. It is very important that you answer these questions truthfully. You could be breaking the law if you do not. Not disclosing an existing condition could result in personal harm during the stressful environment of basic training.

When you have completed all of the steps of processing, you are ready for the oath of enlistment.

This "oath" means you are committed to joining the armed service. It is a contract. The oath you will take is the same one that many generations of Americans before you have taken with pride.

Family members may attend the oath of enlistment.

The last thing you will do at the MEPS is sign your delayed entry contract or your enlistment contract.

Your MEPS will assist you in every step of your enlistment process. We'll make sure you're qualified and ready for service in the United States armed forces.

With your cooperation and the promise of a bright future, we're proud to say "Welcome to the team."

 

 
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